AirPlay and a Rowing Machine

Like so many other people in the IT field, it’s not the easiest things for me to find time during the day for all the things I want to do.  Life gets busy and priorities happen. As a single father with three kids, this means that it’s tough to find time to get to the gym.

As everyone’s aware, we’re also going through an intense period of change in the networking world where network engineers need ( in my opinion ) to start broadening their skills sets to include coding, DevOps tools, etc.. There are a LOT of resources out there, many of which are available in video format. 

Whether that’s things like the great all-access pass video library from INE, the video content from Coursera classes, or just Youtube, there is a huge amount of content available to us. 

I’ve got two goals major life goals this year; get back in shape, and gain NetOps skills. Makes sense to combine the two. 🙂  

My Problem

One of the biggest problems that I have is that a lot of this material is BORING. It’s dry. There’s not a LOT of content out there yet that directly applies the skills I want to learn to networking. So I end up having to learn how to use python to convert between Celsius and Fahrenheit. (How’s that going to help me in my career? )

It’s tough to stay awake through a lot of this content. Some presenters make the material better than others, but i often find my mind wandering after the first 5 minutes. If I’m not focused, I’m not learning. If I’m not learning, I need to watch the same boring video until I get what I need from it. 

Sounds a bit torturous, doesn’t it? 

My Solution

When I was studying for my CCIE, I actually had the same problem. Cisco Docs are not exactly the most riveting prose the english language has produced, but I had to learn the material. My solution was to combine physical activity with the study process. Hard to fall asleep when you’re working out, right?

I ended up buying a treadmill for my apartment. Looking back, I can’t even begin to imagine the amount of miles that I walked that year. I can also tell you that I was probably in some of the best shape of my life. I would walk and read as long as I could. Then I would stop, do some other physical activity pushups, sit-ups, whatever..  and then go back at it again. For months on end, that’s what I did every night. ( Single with no kids in those days ). 

Interestingly enough, what I found is that I was able to retain more information when I was studying while working out then when I was just hitting the books at the table. I’m sure there’s lots of studies about how the increased blood flow to the brain during physical activity makes learning more effective, but I will leave that to as an exercise in google-fu for the reader to find them. 

Fast forward 10 years, and I don’t have to flip pages anymore. The video revolution means that I can hit at least two of the learning paths, visual and auditory, as well as get a work out in at the same time. Efficient, and productive. 

My solution is built around Apple products, but feel free to substitute in what ever technology gets you to the final goal.  

In a nutshell, the setup looks like this

  • Flat screen TV
  • Apple TV connected to TV
  • Rowing Machine in Front of TV

So basically, I airplay the video content from whatever device I have handy, jump on the rowing machines, and I stay awake through some REALLY boring material while burning some calories.

Other Tricks

For those interested, here are some other tools that make this flow a bit more smoothly

Screenflow  – This application allows me to capture video content with the system audio. Great stuff for making sure you have content offline. 

iFlicks2  – This application allows me to edit the metadata on the videos I create with Screenflow. Most of the time, I end up taking an entire play list worth of content, organizing it as a TV Season and then add the episode numbers to the videos so that they play in order. Very slick and means I don’t have to manually intervene when watching a play list. Not to mention, I can also then sync the material to my devices and review the content when I’m trapped in a plane with no wi-fi. 

 

And You?

Have any productivity/study/health tips that you want to share? Feel free to post in the comments below.

 

@netmanchris

Advertisements

Introduction to R and SWIRL

So I’m taking a Cousera course from John Hopkins on Data Science.

The course uses the R programming language which is a derivative of the S programming language that came out of Bell labs in the 70’s. I’m a huge believer in network programability and SDN in general. From a traditional  Network Management point of view, most of the work getting done and discussed today is really around the C in the FCAPS model. There are some people, like Jason Edelman, Matt Oswald, etc… who are using network programability for automating troubleshooting tasks, but most of those are pretty straight forward

  • automate information gathering
  • automate troubleshooting
  • Identify the corrective action

Once you’ve got the corrective action nailed down, you could also automate the fix, but there are a lot of people who are still nervous about having changes happen without a human being involved. 

Automating configuration management and configuration based fault detection and error correction are great things. But there are other parts of the network that can benefit from the application of a programming language to old problems. 

I’m personally interested in the massive amounts of data that the network holds. We’ve got a ton of instrumentation within the network that is just setting there to be accessed, tracked, and mined for useful insights. 

Data Science is all about different methods to scroll through all the data in a scientifically reproducable manner, hopefully gain some insights.

The Tools

Like python, R has an IDE available that will allow you to run R code interactively, or through R files. It can be downloaded at the CRAN site here

There’s also a better IDE available called R Studio that allows some additional functionality which is available here 

SWIRL is a library which allows learners to access some interactive tutorials written in R for R. There’s a GIT repository here which provides a set of tutorials for different courses that allows you to get a feel for the language syntax, creating functions, etc…  

 

R Studio and Swirl

Once you install the SWIRL library, which is really easy using the RStudio Install Packages feature, you load the SWIRL library ( think IMPORT in Python ) using the library(swirl) function. Once you’ve done that, you can either download the course files from the GIT repository, or you can install directly from within R ( uses CURL in the background to download the files directly into your working directory ). 

As you can see in the screen capture, I’ve got a few different course installed, and each of the courses has a bunch of lessons inside them. The screen capture shows the lessons within the R Programming course. What’s also cool about this is, assuming that you’re enrolled in the Coursera R Programming course, you can complete the lesson, input your username and password ( specific to your course, not your cousera password ) and magically, you get extra credit for the course lessons you complete.   

Extra credit is a good thing.

 

Wrap Up

I’ve only been into R for about a week. It’s got some nice features, but to be honest, I don’t have enough coding experience to really give a qualified opinion on the subject. I’ll continue to work with it and see where things go.  There’s still a ton of python that I need to learn, but I’ve already found a native python library called rpy2 that allows me to access native R libraries from within my python code. Best of both words I guess. 🙂

 

It Generalist or Network Specialist?

Very shortly after posting this blog, I was pleasantly surprised by a comment from Ethan Banks. Apparently my posting and his free time aligned. 🙂   One line of his comment really got thinking about where I want to take my career in the future. You can read the whole comment, but the part that got thinking was Ethan’s comment “I’m looking into becoming more of an IT generalist in the long run.”.

 

IT Generalist vs. Network Specialist

When I went back and read my post, I can definitely see where the IT Generalist thought came up. There’s a lot of different skills that I”m trying to develop this year, and to be honest, there’s probably a lot more that I’m going to have to gain before I can start developing in the areas that I really want to go after.  For an example, I just spent a few hours reading about GIT.

GIT was not on the list, but I’ve just spent a few very precious hours of my time because it’s almost unthinkable now to be doing any software development without using GIT to share your work. It’s the standard and I just don’t have a job enough working knowledge of repos and forks, and merge’s etc…  just not something I’ve had to pick up in my career yet. So although it’s not on my list, it’s a pre-requisite for really being able to use the skills I want to develop.

So, back to the question; Am I trying to become a IT generalist or a network specialist? I’m not quite sure I have an answer to that yet. But i think that we need to first ask the question: “what is the network?” before I can figure out an answer.

I think this was an easy question a few years ago, but it’s getting much much harder to figure out where my areas of responsibility as a networking professional now ends.

 

How many Tiers?

I was having a conversation with @networkstatic a couple weeks ago and we were laughing the whole idea of a two tier network. Now, I work in marketing and I understand that the point of the phrase “two tier network” is really designed to communicate that there’s less hardware involved, therefore less cost, less latency, less complexity, etc… But once the marketing is down and the POs have been cut, it becomes time to operate the network and then the number tiers suddenly is a whole different number.

Think about a typical connection from a user to an application. Let’s assume that we’ve got typical architecture where there’s a user on a tablet trying to access an application in a data centre somewhere. I’m sure someone is going to disagree and we could easily expand the DMZ into a few more tiers, but for discussion purposes, just work with me here.

 

Network Tiers

Now by my count, this “two tier” network is actually going through thirteen different tiers in the network where policy can be applied which would potentially alter how the traffic would flow through the network, which of course impact the quality of the specific application that the user is trying to access.

Arguably, the last OVS/Linux Bridge layer would not be there for a lot of typical networks, but with technologies like Docker and Rocket, I think we’re going to see that become more commonplace over the next year. This also doesn’t even factor in the whole overlay/underlay and VTEP mess that can also throw another wrench into the mix. But I think you get my point.

Closing the loop

So bringing this back to the opening question; If a networking professional has responsibility to understand the end-to-end path and where issues may arise for a connection between a consumer and a service, it would seem that we need to develop skills across the entire stack.  There are a lot of other places where a problem can arise; database seek times, noisy neighbour issues in a storage array. Badly coded applications, etc…  I would not argue that a network engineer be knowledgable on the ins and outs of ALL of things that can go wrong, but I do believe that we should be making a fighting attempt at understanding the parts that affect our craft.

In the long run, I think we’re going to continue to see networking divide into sub-professions that specialize into specific architectural blocks of the network. Although there may be a lot of common knowledge, I would also argue there’s also a lot of specialized knowledge that can only be gained through experience dedicated to one of these architectural blocks over a period of time.

Network Disciplines List

 

Then again, I might be over thinking the whole thing. It’s also possible that the network knowledge will start to become considered generalist knowledge.

What do you think? Post your comments below.

 

@netmanchris

Plans for 2015: Where to from here?

I know I’m a little bit late for New Years resolutions, but it’s been a tough decision making process. There is so much going on right now in the networking industry and, to be honest, I’m not sure that networking is going to be a skill that will demand the premium that it’s been able to for the last 10-15 years.  Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying that networking is dead. In fact, just the opposite, networking is going to flourish. There is going to be so much networking that needs to be done that the only way we will be able to deal with it is to dump all of our collective knowledge into code and start to automate what would have previously been the domain of the bit-plumbers that we are. 

 

What skills to pick up in 2015:

So the question: What skills am I looking at picking up in 2015?  I am a huge believer the infrastructure-as-code movement. Looking at what leaders like Matt Oswald, Jason Edelman, Brent Salisbury, Dave Tucker, Colin McNamara, Jeremy Schulman, etc… are taking us, it’s obvious that coding skills are becoming a mandatory skill for anyone in the networking field who wants to become, or remain, at the top of the field.  That’s not to say that core networking skills are not going to be important, but I’m definitely branching out this year in trying to gain some another language, as well as improve my chops with what I already know.

Increase Python Skills

As anyone who’s been here for the last year knows, I’ve been playing around with python a lot. I’m hoping that 2015 will allow me to continue to increase my python skills, specifically as focused around networking, and I’m hoping that I will have enough time to go from just learning to actually contributing back to some code to the community. I’m signed up for Kirk Bayles Python for Networking Engineers course starting in January, as well as going through a few different books. Bets of all, my 9 year old son has also shown some interest in learning to code, so this might actually become a father son project.

I’m also hoping to get more involved with things like Ansible, Schprokits, as well as possibly releasing some of my own all projects.  Crossing my fingers on the stretch goals. 🙂

Gain Data Analysis Skills

Cousera is awesome. If you haven’t checked it out, you need to. You would have to be living under a rock buried in a lead can stored in a faraday cage at the bottom of the ocean to not have heard about SDN. I believe that there’s an ENORMOUS opportunity within the networking space for applying data analysis techniques to the massive amounts of information that flows across our networks every day. There’s a Cousera Data Science Specialization that I’m signed up for that I”m hoping will start me down the path of being able to execute on some the ideas that I’ve had bouncing around in my skull for more than half a decade. I’m sure I will be blogging on the course, but you might have to wait for some of the ideas.  

Virtualization-Ho!

Docker, Rocket, NSX, ESX, KVM, OVS. They are all going to get a little love this year from this guy. I’m not sure how much I’m going to be able to consume, but I believe these are all technologies that are going to be relevant in the coming years. I believe that Containers are going to get a lot of love in the industry and companies like http://www.socketplane.io are going to be something I”m watching closely. 

Networking Networking Networking

This is my core knowledge set and, I believe, what will continue to be the foundation of my value for the foreseeable future. I hit my CCIE Emeritus this year and also had a chance to attend a Narbik bootcamp. It was an incredibly humbling experience and reminded me of how much there is still to learn in this space that I love. If you get a chance to attend a Micronics CCIE bootcamp, I couldn’t recommend it highly enough. There are very few people who understand and can TEACH this information at the level Narbik can. I’m actually planning on finding time to resit the bootcamp this year just soak up more of the goodness. 

 

Plans Plans Plans

2014 was a bit of a mess for me. But I think I still did fairly well in executing on gaining some of the programming skills that I wanted. 2015 is going to be a crazy time for the whole industry. I’m not sure which of these four areas is going consume the most of my time. The way our industry has been going, it’s entirely possible that I will fall in love with something else entirely. 🙂  

If at the end of 2015 I have managed to move forward in these four areas by at least a few steps, I think I will consider the year a success. 

 

What about you?

 

@netmanchris

 

Which HP Switches will run OpenFlow?

Every once in awhile someone reaches out to me wondering if the older HP Provision switch they have is OF capable or should they just through it in the garbage. 

One of the easiest way to decide on blog post is “If you’ve been asked the same question more than three times…”. 

EDIT:  These switches can all run OpenFlow1.3.  Table sizes vary per model. Check the release notes and product documentation for specifics around what of the optional OF1.3 spec is covered. (hint: None of these switches support MPLS ) 

Stackable Swiches

HP 3500yl

HP 6600

HP 2920

HP 3800

Chassis Switches

HP 5400zl

HP 8200zl

 

Getting OpenFlow Code

So pretty much all of these switches have the HP warranty, which means you should be able to get code for all of them from the HP support website. Easiest way is to go to http://www.hp.com/networking/support and should be good to go. It may be that all of these switches are covered under the warranty, but I didn’t verify, so I’ll leave that you to. 🙂 

 

Happy NewYears!

@netmanchris